mrphrasalverb

easy approach to phrasal verbs

PHRASAL VERB OF THE DAY: SHAKE UP

Publicat el 13 de juny de 2014 per ealonso
PHRASAL VERB OF THE DAY : TO SHAKE UP

Meaning: discipline idle or unruly people by handling them vigorously

USE: completion, metaphorical

SYN: re-organization

 

Consumer rights shakeup offers online shoppers more protection

Legislation aims to clarify cancellation rights and give customers who shop online or by phone more time to return products
Online shopping

The Consumer Rights Directive will give people greater protection against rogue traders, according to Which? Photograph: Brian Jackson/Alamy

British consumers will have more time to return an item bought online, by phone or at home under a package of tougher rights that come into force on Friday.

In what is being hailed as the biggest shakeup of consumer protection laws in a generation, shoppers will be given 14 days, rather than the current seven, to return an item. They will also no longer be forced to pay premium rate phone numbers when telephoning retailers’ customer service phone lines about something they have bought. Retailers will now have to offer a number that is charged at standard call rates.

The Consumer Rights Directive will apply in all 28 EU member states from Friday. The new legislation aims to clarify information rights and cancellation rights, and to prohibit some hidden cost practices when consumers buy certain goods and services.

“The Consumer Rights Directive will give people greater protection against rogue traders and strengthen their rights when shopping online,” said Which? executive director, Richard Lloyd. “These changes, coupled with the new consumer bill of rights, will give people more power to challenge bad practice.”

In the UK the directive is being implemented through the Consumer Contracts Regulations and replaces the Distance Selling Regulations and Doorstep Selling Regulations. They are separate from the consumer rights bill – which contains further protective measures – currently going through parliament.

Further changes in the new regulations include a ban on “pre-ticked” boxes for payment of additional services, such as travel insurance, when buying a holiday, and on excessive “administrative” credit and debit card surcharges on flights and concert bookings. However, some contracts are excluded from the scope of the new regulations – notably financial services, package travel and gambling.

Consumer minister Jenny Willott said: “What we want to see are empowered, savvy shoppers who know their rights, look around for the best deals and drive competition.”

Justin Edgar of London law firm Harbottle & Lewis added: “The regulations herald the beginning of what it is expected to be biggest shake-up of consumer protection laws in a generation. They will put considerable new responsibilities on traders in relation to just about everything in the business to consumer relationship..”

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

PHRASAL VERB OF THE DAY: GET OVER

Publicat el 13 de juny de 2014 per ealonso

PHRASAL VERB OF THE DAY : TO GET OVER

 get over something to find a way to solve or deal with a difficult problem

USE: completion( thoroughness)

 

Carolyn Hax: Expectant mom wants in-laws to get over her parent’s tipsy toast

Carolyn Hax

 Columnist   

Carolyn Hax started her advice column in 1997, after five years as a copy editor and news editor in Style and none as a therapist. The column includes cartoons by “relationship cartoonist” Nick Galifianakis — Carolyn’s ex-husband — and appears in over 200 newspapers.
June 11 at 11:59 PM

Adapted from a recent online discussion.

Dear Carolyn:

At my wedding six years ago, my mother gave a tipsy, boneheaded toast that implied she wasn’t all that fond of my husband. My husband has gotten over it — he and my mom actually have a great relationship — but his parents were completely offended, and made it clear at the time that they weren’t interested in any joint family hangouts.

This hadn’t been a problem, as our parents live 500 miles away from each other, but now my husband and I are expecting our first child. I anticipate some family blending is going to be necessary.

Do you have any advice for how I can mend this unkempt relationship? I don’t expect my mom and mother-in-law to become BFFs, but I feel the disastrous toast should be addressed before throwing them around the same holiday table.


(Nick Galifianakis/For The Washington Post)

Belatedly joining families


Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

PHRASAL VERBS IN THE FICTION OF VIRGINIA WOOLF: THE WAVES

Publicat el 13 de juny de 2014 per ealonso
                                                    THE WAVES

Page 3. There are three phrasal verbs on this page:

1.- To draw out :

Meaning:  to move out of a place 

Text: “…the wave paused and then DREW OUT again “

USE: from interior to exterior 

2.- To tear away: 

Meaning: to  remove (oneself, for example) unwillingly

Text: ” and the air seemed to become fibrous and to TEAR AWAY “

USE:  removal (towards absence)

3. To rub out: 

Meaning:  to remove with a rubber something written or drawn in pencil

Text: “... until the dark stripes were almost RUBBED OUT ” 

USE: disappearance, elimination, metaphorical

The sun had not yet risen. The sea was indintinguishable from the sky, except that the sea was slightly creased as if a cloth has wrinkles in it. Gradually as the sky whitened a dark line lay on the horizon dividing the sea from the sky and the grey cloth became barred with strokes moving, one after another, beneath the surface, following each other, pursuing each other, perpetually.

   As they neared the shore each bar rose, heaped itself, broke and swept a thin veil of white water across the sand. The wave paused, and then DREW OUT again, sighing like a sleeper whose breath comes and goes unconsciously. Gradually the dark bar on the horizon became clear as if the sediment in an old wine-bottle had sunk and left the glass green. Behind it, too, the sky  cleared as if the  white sediment there had sunk, or as if the arm of a woman couched beneath the horizon had raised a lamp and flats bars of white, green and yellow spread across the sky like  the blades of a fan. Then she raised her lamp higher and the air seemed to become fibrous and to TEAR AWAY from the green surface flickering and flaming in red and yellow fibres like the smoky fire that roars from a bonfire. Gradually the fibres of the burning bonfire were fused into one haze, one incandescence which lifted the weight of the woollen grey sky on top of it and turned it to a million atoms of soft blue. The surface of the sea slowly became transparent and lay rippling and sparkling until the dark stripes were almost RUBBED OUT. Slowly the arm that held the lamp raised it higher until a broad flame became visible; an arc of fire burnt on the rim of the horizon, and all round it the sea blazed gold.

   The light struck upon the trees in the garden, making one leaf tranparent and then another. One bird chirped high up; there was a pause; another chirped lower down. The sun sharpened the walls of the house, and rested like the tip of a fan upon a white blind and made a blue fingerprint of shadow under the leaf by the bedroom window. The blind stirred slightly, but all within was dim and unsubstantial. The birds sang their blank melody outside 

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

PHRASAL VERB OF THE DAY : KICK OFF

Publicat el 12 de juny de 2014 per ealonso

KICK OFF:


Meaning. when a football match kicks off, the players start it by kicking the ball.

USE: in an outward and upward direction

 
 

Brazil World Cup guide

  • Brazilian supporters Brazil

    The World Cup starts here …

    It’s all about to kick off in Brazil as the World Cup heads to the world’s greatest footballing nation. Explore the host cities, the beaches and beyond with our interactive guide to the country

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

USE OF THE PARTICLE “OUT” WITH PHRASAL VERBS

Publicat el 12 de juny de 2014 per ealonso
Today we will see the use of phrasal verbs with the Particle “OUT” with (3) 

phrasal verbs from the Top 100 List :

— CHECK OUT

— FIND OUT

— GIVE OUT

USES                                                      EXAMPLES   
1. from interior to exterior                   The man went out  
2. extension, projection                        The stones stuck out
3. distribution                                        She gave the papers out 
4. emphasis, enlargement                     They shouted out
5. fulfilment of a definite end                She reasoned the matter out
6. disappearance, elimination               He wiped the marks out 


Check out:

Meaning: leave a hotel after paying the bill

Joan had already checked out of the hotel 

USE: from interior to exterior, fulfilment of a definite end

Find out: 

Meaning: discover a fact  or a piece of information

We may never find out the truth about what happened 

USE: from interior to exterior, fulfilment of a definite end

Give out: 

Meaning: give something to several people 

The office gives out financial advice to students 

USE:  distribution

–@phrasal7verbs

–ealonsotorml@gmail.com 

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

PHRASAL VERB OF THE DAY : KEEP OFF

Publicat el 11 de juny de 2014 per ealonso
KEEP OFF

Not to touch something 

USE: delimitation

Nytimes : Keep your government hands off my cheese 

 

Keep Your Government Hands Off My Cheese

Delicious Parmigiano Reggiano.Tony Cenicola/The New York TimesDelicious Parmigiano Reggiano.

Cheese, or at least all good cheese, arises out of the mysterious mating of milk, enzymes and bacteria, and federal bureaucrats do not take kindly to either mysteries or germs. This week, a few of those bureaucrats horrified cheese-eaters across the country by banning cheese that is ripened or aged on wooden boards, apparently unaware that they are upsetting the natural rhythms of the universe.

As Slate reported today, that ban could spell the end for many award-winning American cheeses, like Cabot’s Clothbound cheddar, Pleasant Ridge Reserve, and Marieke Feonegreek gouda. Shockingly, it could also restrict the imports of cheeses like Beaufort, Comté, and even Parmigiano Reggiano. (A chunk of the latter always occupies a place of honor in my family’s refrigerator.)

The Food and Drug Administration is afraid that the wooden boards could harbor harmful bacteria. They don’t seem to get that bacteria are the whole point of the boards — they are designed to transmit what Slate calls “the rich ecosystem of bacteria and fungi” that gives each cheese a particular flavor or texture. If properly cared for, the boards and their germs don’t harm human life; if they did, the process wouldn’t have continued for hundreds of years.

“A sense of disbelief and distress is quickly rippling through the U.S. artisan cheese community,” according to the Wisconsin blog Cheese Underground.

Naturally, conservatives and libertarians see this move as yet another assault on liberty by the Obama administration. It’s not. It’s a dumb mistake by the F.D.A., not a metaphor for overreach that implies the government should also stop regulating coal emissions and health insurance policies. The editorial board, in fact, has argued that the Obama administration should be doing more regulating, not less.

But the government needs to be smart about what it controls. Misguided germophobia may seem trivial to those without a Reggiano habit, but it creates the kind of skepticism and ridicule that makes it harder to regulate the big stuff.

Updated, 5:55 p.m. | 
This afternoon, responding to the uproar in the cheese world, the F.D.A. issued a statement saying it was willing to work with artisanal cheese makers to determine if some cheeses could be safely made on wooden boards. The agency is “always open to evidence that shows that wood can be safely used for specific purposes, such as aging cheese,” the statement said, according to the Associated Press. Of course, that evidence has been around for a very long time, and the F.D.A. should have examined it long before issuing an ill-advised ban.

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

PHRASAL VERB OF THE DAY : KEEP OFF

Publicat el 11 de juny de 2014 per ealonso
KEEP OFF

Not to touch something 

USE: delimitation

Nytimes : Keep your government hands off my cheese 

 

Keep Your Government Hands Off My Cheese

Delicious Parmigiano Reggiano.Tony Cenicola/The New York TimesDelicious Parmigiano Reggiano.

Cheese, or at least all good cheese, arises out of the mysterious mating of milk, enzymes and bacteria, and federal bureaucrats do not take kindly to either mysteries or germs. This week, a few of those bureaucrats horrified cheese-eaters across the country by banning cheese that is ripened or aged on wooden boards, apparently unaware that they are upsetting the natural rhythms of the universe.

As Slate reported today, that ban could spell the end for many award-winning American cheeses, like Cabot’s Clothbound cheddar, Pleasant Ridge Reserve, and Marieke Feonegreek gouda. Shockingly, it could also restrict the imports of cheeses like Beaufort, Comté, and even Parmigiano Reggiano. (A chunk of the latter always occupies a place of honor in my family’s refrigerator.)

The Food and Drug Administration is afraid that the wooden boards could harbor harmful bacteria. They don’t seem to get that bacteria are the whole point of the boards — they are designed to transmit what Slate calls “the rich ecosystem of bacteria and fungi” that gives each cheese a particular flavor or texture. If properly cared for, the boards and their germs don’t harm human life; if they did, the process wouldn’t have continued for hundreds of years.

“A sense of disbelief and distress is quickly rippling through the U.S. artisan cheese community,” according to the Wisconsin blog Cheese Underground.

Naturally, conservatives and libertarians see this move as yet another assault on liberty by the Obama administration. It’s not. It’s a dumb mistake by the F.D.A., not a metaphor for overreach that implies the government should also stop regulating coal emissions and health insurance policies. The editorial board, in fact, has argued that the Obama administration should be doing more regulating, not less.

But the government needs to be smart about what it controls. Misguided germophobia may seem trivial to those without a Reggiano habit, but it creates the kind of skepticism and ridicule that makes it harder to regulate the big stuff.

Updated, 5:55 p.m. | 
This afternoon, responding to the uproar in the cheese world, the F.D.A. issued a statement saying it was willing to work with artisanal cheese makers to determine if some cheeses could be safely made on wooden boards. The agency is “always open to evidence that shows that wood can be safely used for specific purposes, such as aging cheese,” the statement said, according to the Associated Press. Of course, that evidence has been around for a very long time, and the F.D.A. should have examined it long before issuing an ill-advised ban.

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

USE OF THE PARTICLE “IN” WITH PHRASAL VERBS II

Publicat el 11 de juny de 2014 per ealonso
In this post, we analyze the 4th and last Phrasal Verb with the Particle IN 

included in the Top 100 phrasal verbs list.

–. Log in:

Definition: to start using a computer, by typing a particular word

Log in before ten o’clock this morning

USE: from exterior to interior

Syn: log on

USE                                                                     EXAMPLES

1. from exterior to interior                                The man came in
2. from a distance to a nearer point                  The line curved in
3. in a particular place (home, office, etc)       The familiy dined in yesterday 
4. restricking sb or sth to a particular place     The village was snowed in 
   
                                                                            for a week 

–@phrasal7verbs

–ealonsotorm@gmail.com
                                                                        

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

DAY’S PHRASAL VERB . TAKE UP

Publicat el 10 de juny de 2014 per ealonso

Attacks on breastfeeding mothers speak to a far bigger online problem

The abuse generated by a picture of a student breastfeeding at her graduation is an indication of the scale of woman-shaming on the web
Mothers breastfeed babies at a 'breastfeed-a-thon' photocall in London

Mothers breastfeeding in London. ‘This isn’t a breastfeeding problem. It is an issue that feminists need TO TAKE UP , especially those who haven’t yet engaged with the inequalities women face when they become mothers.’ Photograph: Martin Argles for the Guardian

Karlesha Thurman wasn’t looking for controversy when she posted a picture of herself breastfeeding at her graduation ceremony on Facebook. “I found out I was pregnant [in] my last year of college,” the 25-year-old American wrote. “She was my motivation to keep going, so me receiving my BA was OUR moment.”

Nevertheless after the image went viral, Thurman faced an onslaught of sexist criticism. Commenters bemoaned her “inappropriate” behaviour; others indulged in some misogynistic name-calling. “Nobody told her to hoe around in 3rd period She should’ve been doing her work & maybe she wouldn’t be breastfeeding during her graduation”, offered one charming Twitter user.

Thurman’s online abuse is the latest in a seemingly never-ending stream of mother-shaming media stories. From Instagram guidelines that censor breastfeeding images to UK-wide “nurse-ins” responding to a mother being called a “tramp”, there is barely a week that goes by without a story of someone being told to breastfeed in the toilets.

For some, the media are simply getting their nursing bras in a knot over nothing. Emma Pickett of the Association of Breastfeeding Mothers thinks that for the vast majority, breastfeeding in public is nothing unusual: “Most people see a photo like Karlesha’s and think, ‘lovely’ or nothing at all, and look at the cat picture that comes next on their feed.”

I breastfed my eight-month-old son in a cafe while writing this piece and received only positive comments about my capacity to multitask. While I accept that most people don’t suffer serious abuse for breastfeeding, there are strong arguments for why stories like Thurman’s shouldn’t be brushed aside. As Marcia Lord, vice-chair of Doula UK, explains: “If we tolerate this we are perpetuating the myth that women using their breasts for something other than the male gaze is somehow disgusting. Women are increasingly looking for their breastfeeding support online but often come across stigma and condemnation instead.”

This has to be bad news for new mothers, the majority of whom want to breastfeed. Yet with UK rates falling for the first time in 10 years, confusion about whether it’s OK to feed your baby outside of a toilet stall cannot be helping matters. This is particularly true for young mothers for whom social pressures contribute to low breastfeeding rates. African American women such as Thurman are also less likely to breastfeed, though in the UK statistics suggest that black and Asian mothers have the highest breastfeeding rates.

Damaging as this might be for breastfeeding, the issue goes far beyond the frankly boring-by-now breastfeeding debate. It really doesn’t matter to me how a woman chooses to feed her baby as long as she is well informed, well supported and happy with her decision, which sadly we know many women are not.

The shaming and abuse of women on and offline, the ridiculing of their choices, the commentary on their bodies and the infringement of their basic human rights is, of course, a much bigger problem. That breastfeeding mothers, simply going about their daily business with a hungry infant in tow, can be at the sharp end of this is indicative of the scale of this wider issue.

It is for this very reason that Twitter-user @ish_chel polices the social networking site engaging with those who mother-shame. While reading her conversations isn’t good for the blood pressure, she is compelled to stand up for those invisible mothers, as she believes “women need to feel that they won’t be attacked when they are responding to their baby’s most basic needs”.

This isn’t a breastfeeding problem. It is an issue that feminists need to take up, especially those who haven’t yet engaged with the inequalities women face when they become mothers.

In the meantime, I am about to feed my baby in public again. It’s not quite aTalullah Willis-style topless demonstration, but while there are still people who don’t get the irony in Sparrow Folk’s Ruin Your Day With Tits, I reckon I can add protester to my CV.

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

USE OF THE PARTICLE “IN” WITH PHRASAL VERBS

Publicat el 10 de juny de 2014 per ealonso
In this post, we are going to see how THE PARTICLE “IN” is used.

The three Phrasal verbs studied here come from the list of Top 100 Phrasal

Verbs listed here on  a previous post.

— Check in

— Fill in

— Get in 

USE                                                        EXAMPLES
1. from exterior to interior                   The man came in
2. from a distance to a nearer point     The line curved in
3. in a particular place(home, office)  The family dined in last night
4. restricking sb or sth to                     The village was snowed in
     a particular place                               for a week                            

 

Check in

Definition : to arrive at a hotel where you have arranged to stay and give your personal details to the person working at the reception desk .

Have you checked in yet? 

USE: from exterior to interior 

Fill in 

Definition: to add information in the empty spaces of an official document

I spent over two hours filling the application form 

USE: from exterior to interior 

Get in 

Definition: To arrive home, or at work 

You got in very late last night 

USE: from exterior to interior 

–@phrasal7verbs
— ealonsotorm@gmail.com 

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

DAY’S PHRASAL VERB: LOOK DOWN ON

Publicat el 9 de juny de 2014 per ealonso

Don’t look down on those who eat fast food

“Look down on means to express disdain for something or somebody. It has an idiomatic use . Look down on means to express disdain for something or 

What is going down?  Moralists’ disdain”

Moralists sneer at people who choose McDonald’s or KFC. But not all of us have time to cook a Jamie Oliver recipe

KFC

‘When you are exhausted after a 10-hour shift then soup is fiddly to consume on the way home. Burgers and kebabs, by contrast, are easy to eat with one hand.’ Photograph: Alamy

Researchers at the University of Toronto have discovered that people who live in areas jostling with fast food outlets are constitutionally less able to slow down and enjoy the simple things in life. Apparently, it’s not just a question of additives and sugar ruining their powers of concentration: the Toronto research showed that just looking at a photograph of the McDonald’s golden arch or KFC chicken is enough to give you the fidgets. As a result, you’re less likely to appreciate images of natural beauty or an operatic aria than if you had dined at home with a proper knife and fork.

The panic around the moral and psychological damage of fast food – forget the obesity debate – is a familiar one. Behind Jamie Oliver’s abhorrence of the Turkey Twizzler’s empty calories was always a much deeper suspicion of what it represented: ignorance, indifference, a wilful inability to imagine a better way of feeding the future. It’s for that reason that, back in the early 19th-century, moralists including William Cobbett churned out a whole array of “cottage economies” and “penny cookbooks” aimed at stopping the working classes from squandering money in the pie shop. These prim moral primers were full of bright suggestions for turning the scrag end of lamb and on-the-turn turnips into something that not only nourished body and soul but also saved pennies for a rainy day.

Fifty years later, Mrs Beeton had the moral dangers of fast food in mind when she announced to her readers her reasons for writing her venerable cookbook: she wanted to lure husbands away from the clubs and taverns into which they were apt to dive at the end of a long working day, desperate for a quick supper. Beeton’s solution was to set before the weary homecomer a series of delicious labour-intensive dishes – the sort of thing no short-order cook would contemplate. Her soups often took 15 ingredients and required a 10-hour simmer.

The point of all these initiatives, from Cobbett to Oliver, has always been less about getting nutritious food inside people than to teach them a lesson. Learning how to make and eat slow food is to develop a capacity for delayed gratification that, in turn, fits both maker and consumer for life under capitalism.

Historically, those who could learn to wait, who knew the importance of investing their time as well as their money, would be the ones to profit in the great game. In an era of self-help – Samuel Smiles’s classic manualcame out in the same year as Mrs Beeton’s work – those who managed to avoid the lure of the pie shop in favour of homemade soup were the very people who had the best chance of winning at life.

This is much more than a metaphor. The University of Toronto researchers discovered that those North Americans who live in areas where there is a high density of fast food “cues” do actually find it harder to save for the future. Still, you can’t help feeling that behind the well-meaning implication that rational citizens should eschew eating in the street if they want to enjoy the good life, complete with Puccini and a pension, is a slightly different – which is to say, very old – message. And it is this: anyone who does choose to dive into KFC rather than go home for supper is morally derelict or simply ignorant. Either way, they’re heading for a fall.

What all those Victorian moralists missed – just as the Toronto report ignores – is that fast food is the emblematic product of maturing and late capitalism. Urban workers, forced to work longer and longer hours, do not have the time to invest in cooking from scratch. Those who are obliged to live in shared accommodation and rented digs may not have the right equipment for making real food slowly (Agas don’t fit into bedsits; microwaves do). When you are exhausted after a 10-hour shift, then soup is fiddly to consume on the way home. Burgers and kebabs, by contrast, are easy to eat with one hand and require neither plates nor knives. Far from being the refuseniks of capitalism, unable to master its first principle of delayed gratification, the people who rely on fast food outlets are its honourable foot soldiers. We should salute them.

 

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

PHRASAL VERBS: CONTRASTS BETWEEN “UP” & “DOWN”

Publicat el 8 de juny de 2014 per ealonso
There are four kinds of contrast between the two particles.

(1) opposite directions: 

EXAMPLE: He jumped up .He jumped down. He jumped up and down.

(2) opposite fixed directions: 

EXAMPLE: UP = in a high position :        She nailed the picture up.

                  UP = completely:                   She nailed the door up.

                  DOWN  = in a low position:   She nailed the floorboards down.

(3) relative positions on a scale:

EXAMPLE: She turned the radio up. He turned it down.

(4) good and bad results (= completion )

EXAMPLES:  The fire burned up –and warmed us. (= good result)
           
                     The fire burned down–and we got cold  

–@phrasal7verbs

–ealonsotorm@gmail.com 

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

DAY’S PHRASAL VERB: GET OUT

Publicat el 6 de juny de 2014 per ealonso

GET OUT:  LEAVE

A French message to Britain: get out of Europe before you wreck it

The European Union is on its knees but you, the British, want to block even small steps to democratic legitimacy
Cameron Hollande

Cameron and Hollande. ‘Your demands became even more outrageous… Two vetoes in 10 years, that takes some nerve.’ Photograph: Andrew Winning/Reuters

There is, between you and us continental Europeans, a disagreement which is turning ugly. Your immense history justifies a limitless admiration for you. You were the inventors of democracy and of human rights, you dominated the world for centuries, first ruling the oceans and after that the world of finance. And when apocalypse threatened, your courage and tenacity – you held on long, American and Russian help arriving late in the day – saved our honour and freedom.

We know this and we have never shied away from saying, including in this commemorative week, that we owe you an immense debt. This should not, however, allow you to treat us with contempt and double-dealing.

You do not like Europe – that is your right and it is understandable. You nevertheless joined 41 years ago, but on a misunderstanding. You never shared the true meaning of the project which Winston Churchill, speaking on your behalf, set out in Zurich in 1946 with his incredible words: “We must build a kind of United States of Europe … Great Britain, the British Commonwealth of Nations, mighty America – and, I trust, Soviet Russia … must be the friends and sponsors of the new Europe and must champion its right to live.”

Were you not listening? These were the thoughts of a giant, shared by another giant, Charles de Gaulle.

You wanted trade, and you thought about nothing else. With President de Gaulle gone, you were able to join. But from this point you never, ever allowed even the smallest step towards greater integration, or even the smallest expansion of genuinely joint decisions.

The European community did trade, which suited you, because it defined itself as an economic community, but for those things that should be at the very heart of an economy – taxation, dispute settlement law, social policy – you demanded and imposed the continuation of unanimous decision-making. You wanted paralysis. So many neighbouring countries applauded and envied our achievements and wanted to join. You supported each enlargement; we did too, even though we knew it would dilute the community. But you never allowed the slightest deepening of the union. Europe remained bogged down and badly run, an economic giant, a political dwarf.

Eventually the size and success of the European community meant that it made little sense for it to be involved only in the economic aspects of our shared lives. Diplomacy, defence, justice were all raised. You succeeded in limiting joint political actions to a few narrowly defined circumstances and instances.

Thanks to you, the Maastricht treaty was a failure and only narrowly voted through. You did not have to do much to ensure that the Amsterdam and Nice treaties and the constitutional convention would also be flops because they changed little. Paralysis was guaranteed, because you had already got what you wanted. But you had to make things worse. When you didn’t like the agreed rules, you tore them up by seeking derogations, “I want my money back” agreements such as the British budget rebate, and eventually the right to opt out of policies altogether when they did not suit you.

But your demands became even more outrageous. Amid the paralysis and growing anger the continental desire grew for stronger and more powerful leaders.

The nationalities of the Belgian Jean-Luc Dehaene and the Luxembourger Jean-Claude Juncker could not have bothered you, it was enough that they were federalist in outlook, had strong voices and would not be easily pushed around. Two vetoes in 10 years, that takes some nerve. You dared to do it.

Europe is dying from it. The most recent elections have confirmed this. Even the euro, the only policy that you could not block, yet whose rules you were involved in writing, and which therefore bear your influence, remains weak and suffers from the lack of oversight that you were able to make sure would prevail across the EU.

I know, you are not completely alone in this. The refusal to recognise a common European interest, always putting the national interest first – you reintroduced these ideas and made them contagious. Nobody is perfect. Acknowledge at least that you deserve the prize.

Out of this disaster and ahead of the European elections, the tenacious among us managed to inject more democracy into the rules. So it was agreed that the majority in the European parliament would choose the European commission presidency. It hardly changes the essence, but it is a start, a way to begin restoring public interest and engagement. Personally, I voted for Martin Schulz as it would trouble me to see somebody with a monetarist outlook at the head of the commission. But the people have spoken. It may be relative, but there is a majority and its leader is Jean-Claude Juncker, a bold and courageous federalist. Democracy demands that he become the president of the European commission. But you want to prevent this. You want to break the process by which a more democratic Europe could emerge. You are stopping Europe finding the democratic force and legitimacy that it needs. A leader picked in these circumstances will be weakened. But this is what you want. Without internal democracy Europe is unworthy, and is in the process of dying. And you are sending us back to that Europe, you despise us so much. What right do you have? And beware, this contempt will backfire on you. You will eventually be right.

Now you pretend to want to exit; the majority of your people are in no doubt about it. But you have a banking interest in remaining to capitalise on the disorder that you have helped to create.

So go before you wreck everything.

There was a time when being British was synonymous with elegance. Let us rebuild Europe. Regain your elegance and you will regain our esteem.

This article was published in Le Monde on 5 June 2014

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari

WRITING DOWN THE USE OF PHRASAL VERBS WITH PARTICLE “DOWN”

Publicat el 6 de juny de 2014 per ealonso
Today we are writing down the last three DOWN English Language  Phrasal

Verbs from Top 100 Phrasal Verbs List.

SLOW DOWN

TURN DOWN

WRITE DOWN

USE                                                                  EXAMPLES

1. in an downward direction                          The smoke drifted down
2. direction of writing and cleaning               He wrote the message down
                                                                         He  cleaned the walls down
3. completion ( often with a                           The shop closed down
      destructive effect)                                    He watered  the whisky down        

                  
 

Slow down:
(Same  meaning as slow)
“Slow down! You are driving too fast.” 
USE: downward direction 

Turn down:
Reject an offer or a request 
“How can you turn down such a fantastic job?.” 
USE: completion 

Write down:
Write something on a piece of paper 
“As soon as I have an idea, I write it down.” 
USE: direction of writing 

– @phrasal7verbs

– ealonsotorm@gmail 

Publicat dins de General | Deixa un comentari